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I think that the Hunger Games series does a good job when it comes to issues of gender. (Whether this is true or not is a post for another day.) And that makes it all the more disappointing that I think they seriously drop the ball when it comes to sexuality.

And lo, there were thinky thoughts.Collapse )

So, what are your thoughts? Is this a case of erasure, Unfortunate Implications, both, or neither? How does it compare to experiences you've had with other series?
 
 
31 March 2011 @ 07:41 pm
Panem's technological achievements include invisible forcefields, city-wide booby traps, disturbingly extensive camera networks, and the ability to change a landscape with the push of a button, among other things. So with all of this, I've been wondering...

Why the heck do they still need COAL?

It's just so odd to me that they'd rely solely on a nonrenewable, polluting energy source that's not super-easy to obtain, especially given how small District 12's working population is. The Capitol's way of life depends so much on electricity that it alone seems like it'd require more energy than the coal would provide. Are there energy producers elsewhere we don't know about? (I assume 13 has a reactor somewhere, but that wouldn't help places elsewhere.) Does coal only power the districts, while the Capitol itself has oil, solar panels, etc.? Is a fuel shortage partly why the districts don't have anywhere near the facilities that the Capitol does? Do they not believe in global warming even though the ice caps already melted? What's the deal?
 
 
30 March 2011 @ 03:06 pm
The Girl Who Was On Fire: The Reaping


Come over to my journal for the chance to win free books! Woo! :D
 
 
True story: I am in love with the very idea that a community like this exists. ♥

So my girlfriend and I have gotten hooked on The Hunger Games as of late, and I've been thinking a lot about industry in the districts as it's set up in the series. We know that a good majority of the districts specialize in types of industry that mainly require manual labor from its citizens, ranging from agricultural endeavors (the livestock farmers of 10, the plantations of 11, the fishing industry of 4) to factory work (8's textile industry) to more strenuous and dangerous harvesting of resources (lumber in 7 and coal in 12). It's probably safe to assume that the foundation of these industries is much like what Katniss describes: children go to what in our estimation would be essentially be extended trade school, which teaches propagandist history and prepares them for the basics of their district's industry before they're sent out to work. While it's safe to say that there's probably some variation on this from district to district, what with children like Rue (or, presumably, Finnick and Annie and the rest of our supporting cast from 4) being able to work out on the plantations (or the water) from a very young age, whereas the physical demands of 12's mining industry most likely exempts women and young boys from that field, it seems like the formula Katniss lays out early in the first book is what most districts use.

what about 3 and 6, though?Collapse )

Or, here's another thought: there's also the curious case of 1 to contend with.Collapse )

And a few semi-related tangents that don't fit elsewhere, while we're at itCollapse )
 
 
01 March 2011 @ 10:00 am
Hello not-dead-just-sleeping comm! I'm home with a fever, so I was browsing the news on Current and found this AP article about tiny spy planes made to look like birds or insects.

My first thought: IRL Jabberjays? Scary stuff.

So, I ask, in what other ways might The Hunger Games be predicting the future?
 
 
 
19 January 2011 @ 05:00 pm
Over the course of all three Hunger Games books we never find out what Districts 5, 6 and 9 industries are. I once read somewhere that suggested that District 6's was medicine as their tributes in Catching Fire are morphling addicts, and I'm a fan of that theory. You could say oh it's because they're victors and special, yet Katniss wasn't able to easily get morphling for her mother (based on her surprised reaction to Madge bringing some over). I DON'T KNOW. I also think that one of the District's industries may have been oil.

So, the point of the post is, what do you think were the industries of Districts 5, 6 and 9? 

Also, I submit for your appreciation approval, my dream casting of Haymitch:

plus added scruffCollapse )
 
 
07 January 2011 @ 05:59 pm
Hello all, I bring an interview with Gary Ross, director of the upcoming film version.

two scansCollapse )

Also! For the first time I saw a Katniss suggestion from someone not from this community (I don't think) that I didn't hate! Hailee Steinfeld, 14-year-old actress currently receiving raves for her role in True Grit with Jeff Bridges.



What do you guys think? Personally I kind of love her.
 
 
09 December 2010 @ 03:25 pm
I'm re-reading the first book and two things are bugging me about the feast. spoilers for that book onlyCollapse )
 
 
04 December 2010 @ 04:19 pm
EW is doing their 2010 Entertainers of the Year issue, and... you know, I think I'm going to start a drinking game*. Also, SCollins talks a little about the movie--as usual, no real insight is offered, but I am glad to hear they're involving her in the process so much. (Click for a larger version)



*Actually, I am thinking of writing them a letter: "Oh my god, seriously, could you please do one article on THG that DOES NOT MENTION TWILIGHT would it honestly be that hard??" It's gone from a little exasperating/annoying to downright insulting. Not all heroines are the same person.
 
 
Current Music: Mates of State, "My Only Offer"
 
 
15 October 2010 @ 02:44 pm
Entertainment Weekly has done another write-up on the series, or, as I like to call it, "Let's keep invoking Twilight, because that never gets old!!!"

couple of large-ish picturesCollapse )
 
 
Current Music: Spirited Away